Key Findings in July

Across 14 districts and 2100 respondents, 17 percent claimed that members of their families had been required to migrate, post-earthquake, in order to support their family’s recovery. This represents a slight decrease, from 20 percent, reported in March 2017. Unsurprisingly, women are more likely to report that a member of their family has migrated to support recovery than men (21 vs. 13 percent). Furthermore, rural respondents were also more likely to have used migration as a coping strategy that those in urban areas (18 vs. 15 percent). Among caste/ethnic groups, Dalit and Gurung respondents were the most likely to have a family member engaged in labour migration to support family recovery, at 24 percent each. An interesting correlation was also observed between house status and migration, with the highest migration rates being among those whose homes were completely destroyed, and had not been able to even clear rubble yet. This indicates that those who have not been able to begin their reconstruction process are struggling to find the funds or the opportunities to generate the funds, within their own communities.

What are people saying?

Type of employment

70 %

Foreign employment

70 %

Labour for construction

6 %

Private sector Job

Districts Highlights

29 %

of respondents in Ramechhap said they have a family member who migrated to support recovery

25 %

of respondents in Sindhupalchowk said they have a family member who migrated to support recovery.

22 %

of respondents in Gorkha said they have a family member who migrated to support recovery.